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Rob Diesel ##BEST##



After Volkswagen was caught cheating emissions in 2015, nothing in the world of alternative fuel has been the same. In the United States, Volkswagen was barred from selling affected diesel-powered cars for quite some time, while the rest of the world began their own investigations into just what was going on in the industry. On Friday, manufacturers came to a consensus that they would effectively eat the cost of deploying a software fix in order to avoid an all-out diesel ban in many German cities.




rob diesel


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German auto manufacturers have been working together since July 4th, 2017 in order to achieve an actionable plan ahead of a meeting scheduled with German politicians, including the German Transport Minister, on August 2nd, 2017. This plan would need to create some sort of reasonable action so that manufacturers would appease lawmakers enough to avoid an all-out ban on diesel cars in some cities including the country capital of Berlin and the auto capital of Stuttgart.


The agreement fashioned by manufacturers will cost around the industry around 100 Euros per affected car, though it will total an overall expense of just under 2 billion Euros ($2.33 billion) to remedy all issues.. It also involves the recall of 850,000 additional vehicles sold by manufacturers under the Volkswagen AG branding including Audi, Porsche. In most recalled vehicles, only emission software would require an update while other five, six, and eight-cylinder diesel engines would be replaced at no charge to the customer.


The scare by the German government to ban diesel cars from cities is no surprise, as some European countries, Germany included, have set a end-of-life timeline for the internal combustion engine altogether. France recently joined Germany in this aspect, announcing a country-wide ban that would begin in 2040. Even Porsche has considered leaving its diesel lineup in the dust in favor of electric, a bold stance which Volvo had taken months prior. Automakers will need to continue to appease regulations to prolong the relevance of their powertrains in many progressive cities and countries.


The technologies being developed by Fleetguard and 3M are focused on cost-effective diesel particulate matter filter systems, as well products for nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission reduction. The products will be made available worldwide for automotive, medium/heavy duty trucks, buses and non-road mobile and stationary applications.


The first technology being developed under the JDA is a pleated-media, composite ceramic diesel particulate filter substrate. The material is characterized by light weight, low thermal inertia, and high operating temperature limit. A report from early development stages of the material was presented at the recent SAE Congress in Detroit by Ryan Shirk and Rob Miller (paper #2002-01-0323).


3M has accumulated significant experience in diesel filtration during the development of its Nextel fiber filter cartridges. The Nextel cartridges, which were commercialized in limited niche markets, ultimately have not provided a cost competitive or technically advantageous diesel filter solution.


E. coli bacteria naturally turn sugars into fat to build their cell membranes. Synthetic fuel oil molecules can be created by harnessing this natural oil production process. Large scale manufacturing using E. coli as the catalyst is already commonplace in the pharmaceutical industry and, although the biodiesel is currently produced in tiny quantities in the laboratory, work will continue to see if this may be a viable commercial pathway to drop in fuels.


N2 - The temperature of fuel injectors can affect the flow inside nozzles and the subsequent spray and liquid films on the injector tips. These processes are known to impact fuel mixing, combustion and the formation of deposits that can cause engines to go off calibration. However, there is a lack of experimental data for the transient evolution of nozzle temperature throughout engine cycles and the effect of operating conditions on injector tip temperature. Although some measurements of engine surface temperature exist, they have relatively low temporal resolutions and cannot be applied to production injectors due to the requirement for a specialist coating which can interfere with the orifice geometry. To address this knowledge gap, we have developed a high-speed infrared imaging approach to measure the temperature of the nozzle surface inside an optical diesel engine. We investigated ways of increasing the emissivity of the nozzle surface with minimal intrusion by applying thin carbon coatings. We compare our measurements with those from a production injector that was instrumented with internal thermocouples. Our steady-state off-engine investigation showed that nozzle surface temperature measured by infrared imaging could yield data at 1200 fps with uncertainties of +20K to -1K compared to simultaneous thermocouple measurements. We applied this approach to an optical diesel engine to investigate the effect of injection duration and increased swirl ratio on injector nozzle temperature and surface homogeneity.


AB - The temperature of fuel injectors can affect the flow inside nozzles and the subsequent spray and liquid films on the injector tips. These processes are known to impact fuel mixing, combustion and the formation of deposits that can cause engines to go off calibration. However, there is a lack of experimental data for the transient evolution of nozzle temperature throughout engine cycles and the effect of operating conditions on injector tip temperature. Although some measurements of engine surface temperature exist, they have relatively low temporal resolutions and cannot be applied to production injectors due to the requirement for a specialist coating which can interfere with the orifice geometry. To address this knowledge gap, we have developed a high-speed infrared imaging approach to measure the temperature of the nozzle surface inside an optical diesel engine. We investigated ways of increasing the emissivity of the nozzle surface with minimal intrusion by applying thin carbon coatings. We compare our measurements with those from a production injector that was instrumented with internal thermocouples. Our steady-state off-engine investigation showed that nozzle surface temperature measured by infrared imaging could yield data at 1200 fps with uncertainties of +20K to -1K compared to simultaneous thermocouple measurements. We applied this approach to an optical diesel engine to investigate the effect of injection duration and increased swirl ratio on injector nozzle temperature and surface homogeneity. 041b061a72


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